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Our elected representatives aren’t representing the ‘people’

Posted 3/2/2013

WA State – Pearl Rains-Hewitt raises the following question: “WHO IS DEAD IN OLYMPIA? OUR ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES?”  She reports the following proposed bills which would help the people of Washington state as “dead on arrival”

Reclassify hydropower as renewable energy.

House Joint Resolution 4200 proposes an amendment to the state Constitution to require hydroelectric generation be recognized as a renewable resource. It would help recapture our state’s competitive advantage of offering abundant, affordable, clean energy for manufacturers and consumers. Did Not Receive a Public Hearing in House Environment Committee

Prioritizing state investments in storm water control.

House Bill 1235 would require the Department of Ecology to prioritize storm water assistance funding to local governments to help them satisfy their storm water permit requirements before funding other storm water-related projects. Public Hearing in House Environment Committee

Counting BPA hydroelectric efficiencies as “renewable” under I-937.

House Bill 1347 would allow utilities to count new efficiency measures that produce incremental power they receive through the Bonneville Power Administration as “renewable” under the Energy Independence Act, keeping costs low and giving utilities credit for energy efficiency measures. Public Hearing in house Environment Committee

Regulatory Fairness Act

. House Bill 1162 would require agencies to do a cost burden analysis before adopting rules to prevent new obligations costing more than $500 on individuals without Legislative approval. Public Hearing in House Committee on Government Operations & Elections

Regulatory Freedom & Accountability Act

. House Bill 1163 provides comprehensive reforms that would reduce the regulatory burden on Washingtonians and protect property rights. Public Hearing in House Committee on Government Operations & Elections

Moratorium on rulemaking.

House Bill 1478 would impose a moratorium on formal and informal rule-making by state agencies, except in certain specified instances, to last for three years or until the state is no longer facing financial deficits. Did Not Receive a Public Hearing in House Government Operations & Elections Committee

Legislative approval of certain agency rules.

House Joint Resolution 4204 would propose a constitutional amendment to require certain agency rules to gain legislative approval. Public Hearing in the House Government Operations & Elections Committee

Suspend GMA in counties with persistent unemployment.

House Bill 1619 would Alleviate the cost and encumbrance of controlling growth when none is occurring and when those regulations stand in the way of badly needed economic development. Did Not Receive a Public Hearing in House Local Government Committee

Drug testing for welfare recipients.

House Bill 1190 would require drug testing of welfare/TANF recipients whose initial assessment indicates likelihood that they are using illegal drugs. Did Not Receive a Public Hearing in House Early Learning & Human Services Committee

WHAT IS DEAD IN OLYMPIA?

Too often we focus on the laws THAT have been passed by our LEGISLATING elected officials.

WHEN THE REAL FAILURE OF OUR ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES , CAN BE OFTEN BE FOUND IN THE LEGISLATION THEY HAVE KILLED.

THE HOUSE GOVERNMENT OPERATIONS & ELECTIONS COMMITTEE

The house Government Operations & Elections Committee considers issues relating to the processes of state government, including, state agency rulemaking, procurement standards, e-government and public employment. The committee also considers issues relating to elections, campaign finance, public disclosure and ethics in government.

(Please note: This is a general description of issue areas considered by committees; not a definitive or exhaustive listing. It is provided solely to assist the public in understanding the general roles of House committees.)

LET’S FOCUS ON THIS HOUSE COMMITTEE (what issues do they consider?)
Who is responsible for the DEAD LEGISLATION listed below?

What problems are ‘we the people’ having with this committee, these representatives and the following issues?

1. Appointed state agency rule making (WAC’S)?
2. Elections
3. Campaign finance
4. Public Disclosure?
5. Ethics in Government?

Do you see any conflict of interest?

Here are their NAMES and PHONE Numbers – Committee Members

Representative Room Phone
Hunt, Sam (D) Chair LEG 438B (360) 786-7992
Bergquist, Steve (D) Vice Chair JLOB 322 (360) 786-7862
Buys, Vincent (R) * JLOB 465 (360) 786-7854
Taylor, David (R) ** JLOB 428 (360) 786-7874
Alexander, Gary (R) LEG 426B (360) 786-7824
Carlyle, Reuven (D) JLOB 325 (360) 786-7814
Fitzgibbon, Joe (D) JLOB 305 (360) 786-7952
Kristiansen, Dan (R) LEG 425A (360) 786-7967
Manweller, Matt (R) JLOB 470 (360) 786-7808
Orwall, Tina (D) JLOB 326 (360) 786-7834
Van De Wege, Kevin (D) LEG 434A (360) 786-7916

232A John L. O’Brien, P.O. Box 40600, Olympia, WA 98504-0600
Committee Hearings & Bill Information: (360) 786-7126
Legislative Hotline Operators: 1-800-562-6000

WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR DEAD LEGISLATION IN OLYMPIA?
WHAT ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES?

THE FOLLOWING … IS DEAD LEGISLATION

House Joint Resolution 4200 proposes an amendment to the state Constitution to require hydroelectric generation be recognized as a renewable resource. It would help recapture our state’s competitive advantage of offering abundant, affordable, clean energy for manufacturers and consumers. Did Not Receive a Public Hearing in House Environment Committee
Prioritizing state investments in storm water control. House Bill 1235 would require the Department of Ecology to prioritize storm water assistance funding to local governments to help them satisfy their storm water permit requirements before funding other storm water-related projects. Public Hearing in House Environment Committee Counting BPA hydroelectric efficiencies as “renewable” under I-937.

House Bill 1347 would allow utilities to count new efficiency measures that produce incremental power they receive through the Bonneville Power Administration as “renewable” under the Energy Independence Act, keeping costs low and giving utilities credit for energy efficiency measures. Public Hearing in house Environment Committee

Regulatory Fairness Act
. House Bill 1162 would require agencies to do a cost burden analysis before adopting rules to prevent new obligations costing more than $500 on individuals without Legislative approval. Public Hearing in House Committee on Government Operations & Elections

Regulatory Freedom & Accountability Act
. House Bill 1163 provides comprehensive reforms that would reduce the regulatory burden on Washingtonians and protect property rights. Public Hearing in House Committee on Government Operations & Elections

Moratorium on rulemaking.
House Bill 1478 would impose a moratorium on formal and informal rule-making by state agencies, except in certain specified instances, to last for three years or until the state is no longer facing financial deficits. Did Not Receive a Public Hearing in House Government Operations & Elections Committee

Legislative approval of certain agency rules.
House Joint Resolution 4204 would propose a constitutional amendment to require certain agency rules to gain legislative approval. Public Hearing in the House Government Operations & Elections Committee

God forbid that this committee of elected officials would support vested American Citizens.Who’s interest is conflicted?
Pearl Rains Hewett

 

 

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